Guidelines Give Japan's Porn Stars Right to Extract Themselves

Guidelines Give Japan's Porn Stars Right to Extract Themselves

TOKYO — A new regulation introduced by a Japanese human rights group would force adult distribution companies to pull movies that include performances of those who later object to appearing in them.

Japan’s Adult Video Human Rights Organization has asked adult companies to comply with the new guidelines, according to a report. Performers will be able to exercise to extract themselves from a video once it has been commercially available for five years, or five years and six months after it was shot.

Once a performer decides to extract themselves from scenes, adult producers and distributors also will be restricted from using any marketing materials that include their likenesses, including those found in behind-the-scenes footage, box covers and magazines.

The Adult Video Human Rights Organization created the guidelines to make it easier for actresses to transition out of the industry.

Should a performer choose not to ask for sales to be halted, the distributor’s right to sell the film will be automatically renewed in increments of one year at a time.

Studios are requested to comply with the guideline for films featuring performers who enter into contracts after April 1.

While the guidelines are not government-mandated, compliance with them is the only way for films to be certified as an “appropriately made adult video” by Japan’s Intellectual Property Promotion Association.