Origami Condoms Introduces Re-Invented Condom

Ariana Rodriguez

LOS ANGELES — Origami Condoms is seeking to launch as an alternative to traditional rolled-up condoms with three condom types that emphasis pleasure — rather than protection — for men and women.

The Origami Condoms brand will consist of Origami Male Condom (OMC); the Origami Female Condom (OFC); and the Origami R.A.I. Condom (O.R.A.I), designed exclusively for receptive anal sex. The three patented silicone innovations began U.S. clinical trials in the fall of 2011, with clinical research funding from the National institutes of Allergies and Infectious Disease, and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

The concept of the Origami Condom range is that instead of traditional latex condoms that are applied by unrolling them on, these will be the first to come folded and “slipped” on.

“It is structured like an accordion so the condom can slip on instantly instead of struggling to unroll it like the old latex concept,” the company says. “The bellows-shaped Origami Condoms create a reciprocating motion inside the lubricated condom that simulates the sensation of ‘sex without a condom,’ for both partners, like the real deal.”

The Origami Condom was developed by Danny Resnic, who studied at the Art Center College of Design, Los Angeles, in the mid 1970s.

“A near universal dissatisfaction with the old, rolled latex condom has marked the history of condom use since its creation in 1918,” the company says. “It’s not that people are opposed to safer sex. Populations all over the planet support the concept of using protection against disease and for contraception. However, consumers are eager for a more pleasurable option and the time for a new concept is long overdue.”

Though not yet available commercially, the companys says it expects global distribution and online sales by the end of 2014 following regulatory approvals.

According to Origami Condoms' website, the company is gearing up to launch an Indiegogo campaign on May 7.

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