Judge Orders 'Girls Gone Wild' to Cease Production of Video

Judge Orders 'Girls Gone Wild' to Cease Production of Video
Gretchen Gallen
SANTA MONICA, Calif. – A Florida judge has ordered Joe Francis, producer of the "Girls Gone Wild" video series, to cease production and distribution of a tape that features the images of two women Francis is currently in a legal dispute with.

The video, “Girls Gone Wild: The Seized Video," reportedly features two women who claim Francis' film production company Mantra Films Inc., makers of the "Girls Gone Wild" series, filmed them without their consent on Feb. 19, 2003 at a bar in Norfolk, Virginia.

Both plaintiffs are seeking damages, claiming they were coerced into participating in the taping, but that neither of them ever agreed to anything in writing.

The plaintiffs, Aimee Davalle and Debbie Aficial, are featured in the final edited version of the tape and Davalle appears on the video box cover, according to reports. The two plaintiffs are represented by Virginia Beach attorney Kevin E. Martingayle .

The order to cease producing copies of the video was handed down earlier this month by Circuit Judge Frederick B. Lowe and prohibits Francis and his company from using the names or likenesses of the two plaintiffs. However, the order does not apply to tapes and DVDs that have already been released.

According to the Virginia Pilot, Davalle’s picture was also used in television ads and in catalogs promoting the video title.

A trial date is set for June.

While plagued with legal problems over the years, including racketeering and drug charges against Francis himself, Mantra brings in millions of dollars a year from its "Girls Gone Wild" mail order and website content.

Mantra also has been in talks with offline distributors to expand its brand name into a clothing line. The company also is planning to launch a restaurant chain, the first five of which will be owned and operated by Mantra.