China’s Anti-Porn Purge Spreads to Print

Ed Palomar
BEIJING — China’s national campaign against Internet pornography has moved offline to the print media. At a national literary conference the China Publishing Group called on Chinese publishers to adhere to the country’s anti-porn laws.

The CPG issued a statement contending, “China has lately seen some publications of erotic contents and vulgar taste.” The material it deemed to be objectionable included references to adultery and one night stands. The CPG also criticized “vulgar book titles, abstracts and advertisements.”

In addition, the CPG alleged that some publishers print “obscene books” that are “disguised as academic studies and sex-ed.” The CPG charged producers of audio and video productions, too, with similarly trying to camouflage its erotic content as sex education.

According to Beijing’s state-run Xinhua News Agency, many associations have endorsed the CPG’s anti-porn purge. Until recently, CPG was state-run, but according to Hong Kong’s The Standard, CPG has been turned into an incorporated company.

In March, the Chinese government cracked down on Internet cafes, which are very popular in the developing nation. Since July, Beijing has shut down 700 adult websites and arrested 220 people as part of its ongoing national campaign against pornography.

China’s anti-porn jihad seeks to block adult content from chatrooms and online bulletin boards, as well as foreign websites. Authorities have publicized two phone numbers and a website for informers to report cybersex sites.

According to Xinhua, China – the world’s most populous nation - has 87 million web surfers.