Ruling in ‘Girls Gone Wild’ Name Game

Ed Palomar
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — A judge has ruled that a 19-year-old woman who is suing the makers of the “Girls Gone Wild” video must give Mantra Films her name. However, Tuscaloosa County Circuit Court Judge Steve Wilson also stipulated that the teenager does not have to disclose her name to the public and news media.

The unidentified woman, plus two others, had sued Mantra in March. The plaintiffs allege that a film crew persuaded them to expose their breasts for a “Girls Gone Wild” video around 2002. At the time, the females were only 17-years-old and were minors.

“Girls Gone Wild” specializes in filming young women across the country who are in the act of exposing themselves. In addition to the flasher videos, there is also a Girls Gone Wild paysite.

Fearing disclosure of their identities, two of the plaintiffs dropped out of the Tuscaloosa lawsuit. The remaining plaintiff’s attorney, Calvin Rockefeller, stated that his primary concern is to prevent the media from revealing the identity of his teenage client.

Attorney Timothy Cummins, who is defending Mantra, asserted that the plaintiffs did not back up their allegations with any evidence. The defense attorney claimed that their motives are money and media attention.

Mantra Films and its CEO, Joe Francis, as well as some Alabama video stores that are presumably distributing the “Girls Gone Wild” video, are defendants in the suit. Rockefeller said that Penthouse has also been named in the lawsuit.