Senate Votes to Restore Net Neutrality, but House Unlikely to Follow

Senate Votes to Restore Net Neutrality, but House Unlikely to Follow
Rhett Pardon

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Senate approved a resolution today to nullify the FCC’s net neutrality rollback, but the agency’s new rule remains on track to take effect next month.

The final vote, 52-47, is unlikely to derail the FCC's repeal of Obama-era rules that restrict ISPs’ ability to slow down or speed up users' access to specific websites and apps.

The victory is fleeting because the House of Representatives does not intend to take similar action; Democrats, however, are planning to carry the political fight over internet access into the midterm elections this year.

The FCC still is on track to roll back net neutrality on Monday, June 11.

In order for net neutrality to actually be reinstated, several events must occur. First, the House must use the Congressional Review Act to overturn the policy just like what the Senate did today. Secondly, President Trump, who is against a reversal, must sign off on the policy.