Brits In Arms Over Violent Porn

Gretchen Gallen
UNITED KINGDOM – The controversy over the porn-inspired strangulation of a piano teacher last month after her assailant surfed porn sites that featured dead and tortured women continues to gain momentum among British lawmakers.

The issue has gained so much speed and support from outraged citizens, in addition to the victim's mother, that it has reached Parliament and is now in the hands of the Home Secretary David Blunkett who intends to bring the matter to U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft when he visits the U.S. in the coming months.

At the urging of the victim's mother, a group of Labour MPs started the initial push to shut down Internet sites promoting violence towards women.

According to the BBC, the British government has expanded on that goal and is now aiming to close down all websites that feature violent Internet porn, although the exact definition of either term has not yet been hammered out.

The Brits are reportedly seeking international co-operation on a global ban of such websites.

The push behind the ban on violent porn sites got its start after Graham Coutts strangled teacher Jane Longhurst to death with a pair of her own panty hose after surfing sites that featured necrophilia.

According to the BBC, during Coutts' trial it was revealed that his violent spree had been fueled by spending hours looking at images involving 'asphyxial' sex. This had been a private activity of the young man for approximately eight years, the prosecution revealed.

"We daren't be complacent, as we have seen from the recent Graham Coutts murder conviction and also the increase in pedophile sites on international websites," a British lawmaker was quoted as saying. "What we need is concerted international action, from the government in particular, in order to make sure we have a consistent approach right across the globe."

Coutts was jailed for life at Lewes Crown Court earlier this month.