Gay Porn Icon Wants Folk Club Shut Down

Steve Javors
VALLEY VILLAGE, Calif. — Charles Peyton, known in the adult community as gay porn star Jeff Stryker, is embroiled in a battle over the future of a folk music club that he wants shut down.

Paul Kulak operates bohemian venue Kulack’s Woodshed on Laurel Canyon Boulevard, next to Peyton's office, where fans of folk music’s bygone era can sit and strum guitars. Peyton has wanted the Woodshed shuttered since 2004, allegedly because noise emanating from the club disrupts his concentration as he works on his stage show and writing, according to the Los Angeles Daily News.

Peyton has initiated a one-man war against Kulak, allegedly verbally harassing patrons as they enter the woodshed, and has demonstrated his kick-boxing routine for intimidation outside the club, which was featured on the TV show “Celebrity Justice.”

In 2004, Peyton began complaining about Kulak’s to Los Angeles Councilwoman Wendy Greuel, the Building and Safety Commission and the police. Additionally, both men have restraining orders against each other.

Kulak said the two once were close but had a falling out after Peyton was forbidden from performing the song “Pop It in Your Pooper” at the Woodshed. Peyton discounted this claim, saying problems only arose after he complained about the noise.

Kulak’s 1,000-square-foot club is facing closure Dec. 31, unless he completes proper paperwork that he initially failed to fill out and brings the building up to code, the Daily News reported.

“I've been tortured every night for five years,” Peyton told the paper. “This area isn’t built for this. There’s no parking. It’s a business strip, not a place for a dance hall.”

The pair’s bitter fight came to a head in October after Kulak was arrested on allegations of misuse of land, at which time the building’s landlord told him to secure the proper permits to continue to operate or face imminent closure.

“We’re just a bunch of middle-aged folkies, man,” Kulak told the paper. “He’s trying to make it seem like we’re an outlaw biker bar. As dedicated as I am to keeping it open, he’s dedicated to destroying us.”

Greuel has been criticized by both sides, but said she has focused on zoning issues, not on the war of words. She said she believes that Kulak is close to complying with all zoning and safety codes.

“I’m one of the biggest proponents of having it in that community,” Greuel said. “I’ve done all I can to help him and now, I think he’s on the road to helping himself. As long as Paul’s fulfilled his requirements, he has every right to be there.”