QuickDMCA App: Making Infringement Enforcement Easier

Rhett Pardon

LONGWOOD, Fla. — Industry attorney Lawrence Walters has launched his second legal productivity app: QuickDMCA, which focuses on DMCA infringement notifications.

QuickDMCA is now available for both the Apple and Android devices, and promises to make copyright enforcement easy, Walters said.

“This app is designed to simplify the DMCA notice-and-takedown procedure, similar to what we did with the Section 2257 compliance procedure,” said Walters, in reference to his first mobile app, Quick2257.

Walters said that the app makes it easy for users — fill out some fields and drop down boxes, sign with your fingertip and create a legally compliant DMCA notification of infringement. 

Press send, and the service provider receives a takedown notice, with the required certifications and electronic signature. 

“As producers and performers do more work from their tablets and smartphones, we wanted to provide a simple way to submit a DMCA notice on the fly, as infringements are identified," Walters said. "Once infringing content is found, the app permits users to find a designated DMCA agent, generate a DMCA notice, create a sworn e-signature, and transmit the notice directly from the device."

Walters noted the QuickDMCA app functions with Apple’s recently launched IOS 8, and the newest Android devices.  

“We’ve been offering our law firm’s clients the ability to automatically generate DMCA notices for over a decade via DMCANotice.com, but we recently decided to open this option up to anyone with a mobile device,” Walters said. 

The mobile app does not require any registration data to use, and Walters does not collect any information about the DMCA notices from the user.

Once the app is installed, it can be used to send unlimited DMCA notices without any additional fees, and without sharing any usage information.

Coinciding with the QuickDMCA launch, Walters announced that Quick2257 has received a facelift.

“The latest update to Quick2257 permits users to save 2257 documents directly to their phone, in addition to transmitting them via the device’s email function," he said. "Some performers serve as their own records custodian, so we wanted to ensure that the files could be retained without being sent to an email address.

The new update also simplifies the registration process and includes various other performance enhancements, he said.

QuickDMCA costs users a one-time fee of $4.99, and Quick2257’s introductory pricing of $.99 has been retained.

Both mobile apps are available in iTunes and Google Play.  

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