educational

Building Traffic Through Optimized Textual Content

Stephen Yagielowicz

Ask any search engine marketer and he or she will tell you that the written word is a great means of generating traffic — even when you can’t write (or use) the words that you’re targeting.

Although the addition of targeted text (as actual text, not a graphical representation) on a web page has long been used as a means of boosting search relevance; and likewise, optimized text used in page titles and in Meta keyword and description tags give a boost; it is not the only way to use textual content. For many online operators, article marketing, forum posts, social media and other venues offer a range of traffic building opportunities.

While it’s important to be careful in choosing the words you’ll use, optimizing your site’s textual content is a fundamental step in cultivating better search engine rankings.

Sometimes, you may not want or be able to use certain words in your presentations, but this does not negate the power of text.

For example, tough economic times lead folks to want “free” porn, but misusing the word “free” — such as saying access to a website is gratis when there is actually a fee — will land you in trouble with the Federal Trade Commission. Thus, you may want to say that your porn is better than free — benefiting from the keyword without “lying” about it.

There are times, however, when this strategy should not be used, such as if seeking a way around the use of prohibited terms associated with illegal child pornography images.

ASACP, the Association of Sites Advocating Child Protection, offers a list of terms obtained from its search partners that sites employing user-submitted content — such as a TGP that accepts gallery submissions — can use to automatically filter out illegal terms.

This isn’t just an issue of Best Practices, but of staying out of trouble with the law…

Likewise, affiliates promoting “male enhancement” and other “medical” offers will find that there are a number of terms that cannot be used — such as “cure” or “remedy.” These restrictions will vary by jurisdiction, but trying to push your luck is a bad move.

While it’s important to be careful in choosing the words you’ll use, optimizing your site’s textual content is a fundamental step in cultivating better search engine rankings.

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